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When we talk about men and women balancing work and caring, it can be all too easy to frame the discussion in adversarial absolutes. For instance, when we discuss the gender pay gap and inequality in the workplace and at home, some might take the easy option of saying it is mainly due to men focusing on their careers and not “pulling their weight” at home.

To mark this year’s [Un]Equal Pay Day on 28 August 2019, the Workplace Gender Equality Agency (WGEA) has calculated the date of each Australian state and territory’s [Un]Equal Pay Day.

Last week, in the lead up to Equal Pay Day, the Workplace Gender Equality Agency, (‘the Agency’) in  partnership with KPMG Australia and the Diversity Council of Australia, launched the newest instalment of She’s Price(d)less: the economics of the gender pay gap.

We have waited 59 [un]equal days and finally today is Equal Pay Day, Wednesday 28 August. [Un]Equal Pay Day marks the additional 59 days women must work from the end of the last financial year to earn the same amount as men.

In 2019, [Un] Equal Pay Day falls on Wednesday 28 August, marking the additional 59 day’s women have to work from the end of the last financial year to earn the same amount as men. [Un]Equal Pay Day is a symbolic indicator of the significance of the national gender pay gap and why it matters for Australian women.

The gender pay gap – while it looks like just a number on a page, it means so much more in reality. Ahead of Equal Pay Day this Wednesday 28 August 2019, it is important that we take a step back and really look at what the gender pay gap means for you, your family, your workplace and Australia.

Last month, the Workplace Gender Equality Agency (‘the Agency’) published a quiz testing the public’s knowledge on the gender pay gap. Since its release, the Agency has received over 500 responses. The average score was 71% - 9.2 out of 13. Around one in five respondents scored within 90%-100%. 

The national gender pay gap remains stable at 14.0%, a drop of just 0.1pp over the last six months. This year, [Un] Equal Pay Day will be on 28 August 2019, marking the 59 additional days from the end of the previous financial year that women must work, on average, to earn the same amount as men earned that year.

This fact sheet provides information about gender imbalances in Australian higher education, including gender segregation in fields of study and pay inequality in industries after graduation and on entering the workplace.

For an objective and fair assessment of jobs, gender bias must be considered during job evaluation. If gender bias is not considered, it is possible that key dimensions of jobs typically performed by women are at risk of being undervalued. This can contributed to the perpetuation of the gender pay gap (International Labour Office, 2008).

Standards Australia  have developed standards for Gender-Inclusive Job Evaluation. To support organisations in adopting the standards, the WGEA has worked with a committee of job evaluation and equity specialists to produce a guide to the Australian Standards on gender-inclusive job evaluation and grading.

Image is decorative and depicts the cover of the guide to the Australian standards for gender inclusive job evaluation