Parental Leave

Parental leave continues to be a major feature of Australian workplaces and can provide employers with a competitive edge in the labour market when it comes to attracting and retaining talent. However, men’s access to and uptake of this entitlement remains low. So, why aren’t more men taking parental leave?

In Australia, organisations are moving towards gender-neutral parental leave policies, offering equitable parental leave for all parents.

More men are finding themselves caught in the crosshairs between two diverging expectations: traditional breadwinner and modern father.

At Diageo, from 1 July 2019 all Australian employees will be eligible to take 26 weeks paid family leave regardless of gender, carer status or length of service.

The highest paid men in Australia are being paid at least $162,000 more than the highest paid women, but women could be on par with men in most management roles within the next two decades, our latest Gender Equity Insights report shows.

Friday 8 March 2019 is International Women’s Day. This year’s theme, Balance for Better, is an opportunity to reflect on the areas where balance can better our communities, workplaces and personal lives. Here are some key facts about balance for women and work in Australia.

The highest paid men in Australia are being paid at least $162,000 more than the highest paid women, but women could be on par with men in most management roles within the next two decades, a new report shows. 

Australia’s cumulative retirement system means women continue to retire with roughly half the superannuation of men, with the overall gender difference in superannuation balances standing at 38.8%.

The 2018-19 leading employers understand the importance of parental leave and flexible work as key drivers to lowering the gender pay gap.

This paper explores the different parental leave policies available in OECD countries and offers suggestions for increasing the share of men using parental leave.