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Gender bias is pervasive at work and in organisations, creating inequalities at every stage of the employment cycle. This insight paper highlights some of the research examining how gender bias operates at work and provides evidence-based suggestions for creating more equitable recruitment and promotion systems.

US President Harry S Truman once said “if you can’t convince them, confuse them”. And right now, there is confusion out there. Confusion which is fanning an inferno of misinformation about the concept of equal pay and the concept of the gender pay gap. These two notions are very different and it is time to set the record straight.

Never has the spotlight on unequal pay in professional sport shone quite so brightly as in the past month. The FIFA Women’s World Cup in France saw the reigning world champions, team USA, take out a back-to-back world title – the culmination of a commanding campaign that including a devastating 13-0 win over Thailand.

When we look back at 2019 so far, it is clear there is growing interest in equality for female athletes. There has been much focus on equal representation, equal opportunities and, the big one, equal pay for our female athletes.

More men are finding themselves caught in the crosshairs between two diverging expectations: traditional breadwinner and modern father.

In the lead-up to the announcement of the 2019 Queen’s Birthday Order of Australia awards, community organisation Honour a Woman and the Workplace Gender Equality Agency are highlighting the current gender inequalities in the awards system and asking all Australians to nominate more women for awards.